Showing posts with label galaxy. Show all posts
Showing posts with label galaxy. Show all posts

The Sky at Night - It Came from Outer Space

In August, the most spectacular meteor shower of 2017 coincides with transmission: The Perseids! If it's clear, it'll be a great chance to see scores of bright shooting stars streaking across the night sky. As those shooting stars vaporise in the atmosphere, a small part of some of them will fall to earth as dust.


This dust will contribute to a total of about 40,000 tonnes of space dust and debris that falls onto our planet every year. Chris Lintott and Maggie Aderin-Pocock investigate this mysterious cosmic debris that comes from outer space.

The Sky at Night - It Came from Outer Space
The Sky at Night - It Came from Outer Space

The Sky at Night - Into the Dark Zone

Scientists have spent hundreds of years observing the planets with telescopes and over fifty exploring the solar system through space travel, so you might have thought they knew our cosmic neighbourhood pretty well.


 But actually, they've hardly scratched the surface. The reality is that most of the solar system is still almost a complete mystery. Beyond the orbit of Neptune lies a vast number of strange, dark, icy worlds - the trans-Neptunian objects. And it's only over the last few years that we've even started to see and understand them, and have begun to realise they play a crucial role in the evolution of our solar system.

 Maggie Aderin-Pocock and Chris Lintott discover how we've found hundreds of thousands of these strange new objects, some with multiple moons, others with strange orbits, and some spinning way faster than any planet in the solar system.

 Marcus du Sautoy explores how studying the mathematics governing the behaviours of these objects has changed our understanding of how the solar system evolved, and how it might eventually end.

The Sky at Night - Into the Dark Zone
The Sky at Night - Into the Dark Zone


The Sky at Night - Guide to the Galaxy

All good travel guides need a map, and the team unveil the most detailed 3D map of the Milky Way ever produced. A map that reveals that there may be 50 per cent more stars in the galaxy than we previously thought.



American astronomer Neil deGrasse Tyson gives us a guided tour of the strangest stars we have ever observed, and we discover that the Milky Way may already be colliding with our neighbouring galaxy, Andromeda.

The Sky at Night - Guide to the Galaxy
The Sky at Night - Guide to the Galaxy